The Mangyans of Mindoro Island / Mindoro岛上的Mangyan人 (1992- )

 

Photos and text by Jose Raymond DG Panaligan

摄影+文字:Jose Raymond DG Panaligan

Hanunuo-Mangyan mother and her children seek refuge in a Roman Catholic Church after the military accuse her husband of being a communist sympathizer. | Mansalay, 2003
Hanunuo-Mangyan mother and her children seek refuge in a Roman Catholic Church after the military accuse her husband of being a communist sympathizer. | Mansalay, 2003

 

Made up of seven tribes (Hanunuo, Alangan, Iraya, Gubatnon, Tadyawan, Buhid, Bangon), the Mangyans are bearers of a glorious past. But they are now struggling for rights and ownership of their ancestral lands.

Backed by the military, mining firms and logging concessionaires have been encroaching the Mangyan ancestral lands.

These places, where the last remaining forests are located, have given life and sustenance to the Mangyans, as well as the lowlanders, since pre-Hispanic times.

Like other indigenous groups, the Mangyans have always lived in balance with nature. Their dreams and laughter are etched like the Ambahan poems, carved onto the bamboo trees along the mountain trails with the siyaw (small knife).

“The mountains give us life… That is why we honor them by giving them names,” says a Mangyan elder.

This is a struggle for life, a fight to defend the Mangyan ancestral lands against the greed of mining corporations.

The land is sacred. It is the lifeblood of the tribe.

Alangan-Mangyan at rest, after gathering rattan from the mountains. | Balite, 1997
Alangan-Mangyan at rest, after gathering rattan from the mountains. | Balite, 1997
Hanunuo boy clears swidden. | Abintang, Bulalakaw, 1992
Hanunuo boy clears swidden. | Abintang, Bulalakaw, 1992
Hanunuo-Mangyan people, after planting rice on a upland swidden. | Banhawon, 1997
Hanunuo-Mangyan people, after planting rice on a upland swidden. | Banhawon, 1997
Hanunuo-Mangyan women and children on their way home, after foraging for firewood and harvesting root crops. | Abintang, 1992
Hanunuo-Mangyan women and children on their way home, after foraging for firewood and harvesting root crops. | Abintang, 1992

 

 

菲律宾的Mangyan族由七个部族组成。虽然他们拥有辉煌的历史,但是他们现在却必须为祖先留下来的土地而奋战。

采矿和伐木公司在军队的掩护下逐渐地侵占了Mangyan的土地。

在这些地方,我们还能找到最后的雨林。从西班牙殖民政权尚未入侵以前,这些土地便一直滋养了Mangyan和平地人。

和其它原住民一样,Mangyan族和自然共处。他们的梦想和欢笑象Ambahan诗篇一样,一小刀一小刀地刻在了山林间的竹子上。

一位Mangyan长者道:“山林孕育了我们,所以我们为它命名。”

这是一场为了生存的斗争,一场针对贪婪的采矿公司,和捍卫祖先留下来的土地的战斗。

这些土地是神圣的。那是Mangyan的命脉。

Hanunuo-Mangyan men and children gather for lunch after a “saknungan”--communal assistance to a person who needs helping hands in cleaning a swidden. | Abintang, 1992
Hanunuo-Mangyan men and children gather for lunch after a “saknungan”–communal assistance to a person who needs helping hands in cleaning a swidden. | Abintang, 1992
Hanunuo-Mangyan elders. | Bait, 2003
Hanunuo-Mangyan elders. | Bait, 2003
Hanunuo-Mangyan child with a kut kut--part of a ritual for the dead. |  Agong, Bulalakaw, 1992
Hanunuo-Mangyan child with a kut kut–part of a ritual for the dead. | Agong, Bulalakaw, 1992
Hanunuo-Mangyan fixing a basketball ring. | Balditan, Bulalakaw, 1992
Hanunuo-Mangyan fixing a basketball ring. | Balditan, Bulalakaw, 1992
Alangan-Mangyan toddler. | Balite, 1997
Alangan-Mangyan toddler. | Balite, 1997

Jose Raymond “Bogsi” Panaligan (b. 1969, Manila) is a freelance photographer who works for Philippine publications and local/international NGOs. Since 1992, he has been documenting the plight of the Mangyan people on Mindoro, the Philippines. Panaligan is a member of Alyansa Tigil Mina-ALAMIN, an alliance of anti-mining advocates at Mindoro.

 

Jose Raymond “Bogsi” Panaligan于1969年出生于马尼拉,从事独立摄影,为菲律宾媒体和国内外的非政府组织工作。自1992年起,他致力记录菲律宾Mindoro岛上Mangyan族的生活遭遇。他也是反采矿联盟Alyansa Tigil Mina-ALAMIN的成员。

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